Assistive technology in the workplace blog from celebrating disability website

Assistive Technology in the Workplace

In This Blog: Assistive technology consists of systems and equipment; including physical devices and software. They are designed to maintain or increase performance for disabled people. Disabled people in the UK face disproportionately high unemployment rates, with 53% unemployed compared to only 23% of non-disabled people. Looking to leadership positions, the situation is even more stark – a survey of …

Microphone pointing to a neon sign with blog title “what do you call a disabled person” against a brick wall in a stand-up comedy style

What Do You Call a Disabled Person

In this blog: The question: What Do You Call a Disabled Person is a fairly popular one. People often struggle to engage with disabled people due to fear of offending. Here’s what you can do… Sounds like the start of a very bad joke, doesn’t it?  What Do You Call a Disabled Person? Well it’s not a joke.  Many people struggle to …

2 women talking round a table - How to talk about disability

Disability Language: How To Talk About Disability

In This Blog: disability language can be hard to get one’s head around. One reason for this is because language surrounding disability is so fluid and what was the common term from 30 years ago, may not be the common time today. This blog will help to get to grips with how to know some of the more acceptable terms …

DISABILITY AWARENESS TRAINING BENEFITS

Disability Awareness Training Benefits

In This Blog: there are many benefits to disability awareness training. Within this blog, we have listed just 7 of these and the ways to harness these benefits within your organisation Disability awareness and inclusion training can often take a backseat to other seemingly more pressing priorities within the workplace. However, what many fail to realise is that disability awareness …

The Insidious Result of Language

The Insidious Result of Language

Language surrounding disability has always been a minefield To me, I have always been baffled over the complexity of what people make language to be. When working in the disability charity sector, I was constantly perplexed by the terms that were used to describe disabled people and the help and support that they received. One of the hardest things is …

Neon sign on building We're Hiring

Attracting Disabled Candidates

The Right Candidate When recruiting for a role, whether that role is paid or voluntary, full-time or part-time, you always want to make sure that you’re getting as much value for money as possible. You want to recruit somebody that will do the job to the best of their ability and support you to grow your project/business in the direction …

Don't Ignore Your Disabled Customers - girl with mouth sealed shut

Disabled Customers – Don’t Ignore Them

The importance of web accessibility to disabled customers I received an email the other day from a person I met at an exhibition.  We had been talking about how, when attracting disabled customers, how important web accessibility and tone of voice is.  This person was interested in commissioning services of Celebrating Disability to advise on the overall accessibility and engagement …

sticks and stones

Disabled person vs. person with… The debate continues

The Context Over the last few months and throughout my career, there have been many conversations about whether the term “disabled people” should be utilised over the term “people with disabilities”. Whilst this is a personal choice, most people don’t fully appreciate the differentiation between the two. They therefore believe that it is just a turn of phrase and supports …

Wheelchair wheels on cobbled stones

So Brave

There’s no getting away from the language used to describe disabled people. Before you read any further, have a think about the language that springs to your mind when thinking about disability. What did you come up with? There are the words to describe the person: disabled, person with disability, wheelchair user, wheelchair bound, mentally ill. There are words to …